Gameshare!

  • Opening activity – Have people pair a movement with their name.

Question re: accessibility needs:

  • older folks
  • folks with limited mobility
  • language needs
  • high energy without standing up
  • low-risk activitieis
  • smaller subsections of groups
  • consent/physicality – low physical interaction
  • diversity in willingness to take risks

What folks are looking for:

  • Meeting appropriate ice-breaker

 Why are we learning games? What uses do they have? What challenges we have?:

  • teambuilding
  • figuring out group dynamics
  • trust building
  • games are fun
  • meetings tend to be boring
  • energizers (changing the energy) – opportunity to pause or channel the energy
  • content
  • relationship building
  • allow people to tap into creative & body knowledge
  • bookends trainings (this might be ingrained though)
  • great way to attract people to move from one thing to the next

What about resistance to games:

  • If people don’t have buy in, people will be resistant.
  • Lack of attention to accessibility (assumptions that everyone can stand up, or that everyone wants to be touched, etc)
  • Games can be really fluffy – and they’re taking away from the substance that we want to get at. Especially if it’s unclear how it relates to the content.
  • It’s about using them well, and tying them in well. If the activity is not well chosen, people are going to be more resistant.
  • Facilitators sometimes feel resistant to the idea of games. Lack of training power for those who are looking for the games

Gameshare:

  • Content role play
      • two people demonstrate the content (first time they botch it,  then they do better, then they debrief, then they do it again?
  • Spell your name with your butt!
      • self explanatory, lots of laughs
  • Am I tomato?
      • labels on forehead
      • ask people questions to figure out what they are (questions can be open or limited, yes or no, this or that, for example)
  • Circle and cross
      • make a circle with your right hand, make a cross with your left, then try to do both at the same time (very few people can do this)
      • asking people to jump up and down and laugh for 15 seconds.
      • stretching, breathing, grounding, welcoming people to breath for 3 minutes
      • pairing a guided meditation followed with laughing is hilarious
      • eyes closed laughing sometimes feels funny
      • laughter is healing, good for the soul (great intro), brings in context. Found it easier to laugh when we heard other people laughing.
  • Bingo – “find someone who”
      • try to make it relevant to the content
  • Ex from Empower DC – “find someone who’s been to a rally” “find someone who’s been to a____”
      • implied follow up questions
      • Concentric Circles – had it done with a really big group, you have to find someone to answer the questions & you mill around.
  • Two truths and a lie – often used for silliness, chance to be outrageous
      • seems like something that would work well in a better knit group
      • if this is serious, it could be an interesting experiment
  • Concentric circles
      • subcategory: soultrain parallel lines where one person moves down the line to change partners
  • Alphabet themed questions
      • have people go through the alphabet or a word and think about a work that starts with the appropriate letter that describes a topic to support the content of the workshop
  • All the prompts – poems
      • everyone in a group comes up with a poetry prompt, and then have people write poems to include all or most (or a certain number) of prompts.
  • Jungle animals – what animal?
      • people say animals and animal sounds, good way to break up into groups
  • “Mindmeld word game”
      • goal is to get people thinking on the same wavelength
      • I’m going to count to three and say a word
      • have people listen to one another and think about the word
      • count to three again
      • say another word
      • mostly a listening exercise
  • Story of self
      • from NOI website
      • structured opportunity to give a “story of self” within x number of minutes
      • if appropriate, you can have people give feedback
      • can also be more targeted – “what brings you here today” “why did you become a facilitator?” “what brought you to work with youth?” “why do you do what you do?”
      • “I really liked when you shared this detail, but I’d like to hear more about this moment”
      • what did you like about it? (gathering group wisdom)
      • people get to choose how vulnerable they get
  • awesome & bodacious
      • someone talks for a minute about something inaucuous (their hair or their shoes) partner tries their best not to listen (process is very transparent)
      • awesome people: how does it feel to not be listened to? what were your persons behaviours
      • switch – you don’t get to get back at the person. awesome people are listening for facts, feelings or values (or needs)   
      • and then the awesome people give feedback
      • a&b both  get to tell a story; there’s no revenge.
  • Singing! Art! Drawing! Creative Writing!
      • instead of movement name, maybe a song title

      • give people half of a song line. (memory card style), and they’ll call on someone to see if that person has the other half of their line.

      • then the person can be your partner for the rest of the day!

      • requires prep, knowing your audience (and what songs they would kno

Using What You’ve Learned in Games:

      • whether it’s games or go arounds – there’s an opportunity to apply knowledge from what you learn in activities in the rest of the day
      • games aren’t just distractions or fillers
      • facts, feelings, values
      • people debrief what it feels like not to be listened to (example sex violence survivors – talking to cops, social workers, etc)
      • allows people to talk about active listening and think about building skills around it with low risk

Moving People from Low Risk to Higher Risk Activities:

      • turn next to someone next to you – more than asking a big group a question and asking everyone a question
      • risk can also seem higher if you’re less whatever the norm is
      • instead of make a ridiculous noise and make a motion. – come up with the slogan for our office, come up with a new logo for our organization. (maybe don’t start with pushing the boundaries of movement and singing and actively playing).
      • find the places where people are willing to be silly
      • activities depend on the temperament of the person, it’s important to figure out how to equalize voices
      • identifying moments to step up step back.
      • Opt-in activities are really important.
      • Allow for quiet space. It’s okay if the room is quiet for a minute – because some people need that extra time to think